Category Archive: TransAmerica 1984 pix

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Bike touring again

Self portrait at county campground at Chimacum on Olympic Peninsula, 2006

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/05/bike-touring-again/

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Morse Creek Trestle on Olympic Discovery Trail

This old railway trestle spans about 400 feet over the creek, about 25 feet below. Built for the Seattle, Port Angeles and Western Railway near Port Angeles, it was converted to public use in 1999.


Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/morse-creek-trestle-on-olympic-discovery-trail/

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Old railway bridge on Olympic Discovery Trail

Here's the old railway bridge for bicycle riders and pedestrians on the Olympic Discovery Trail near Sequim. Originally built for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, the bridge is about 90 years old.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/old-railway-bridge-on-olympic-discovery-trail/

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Cyclist crossing Dungeness River on Olympic Discovery Trail

The focal point of Railroad Bridge Park at mile 17 of the Olympic Discovery Trail is the trestle and bridge over the Dungeness River. Built about 1915 for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, the 585-foot trestle leads to a 150-foot bridge. The bridge is located at Railroad Bridge Park, located west of Sequim.


Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/cyclist-crossing-dungeness-river-on-olympic-discovery-trail/

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Johnson Creek Trestle on Olympic Discovery Trail

The 410-foot-long Johnson Creek Trestle marks the entrance to the Olympic Discovery Trail from the east. The trestle soars 86 feet above Johnson Creek and used to carry trains on the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railway (later shortened to the Milwaukee Road) from 1915 to 1980. The railroad operated as the Seattle & North Coast until 1985.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/johnson-creek-trestle-on-olympic-discovery-trail/

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Hard surface bicycle bypass near Port Angeles

The main route of the Olympic Discovery Trail takes cyclists along the top of a seawall fronting the Strait of Juan de Fuca about 4 miles from Port Angeles. It's pretty loose gravel and I walked a section to avoid dumping the bike. On the way back, I easily rode along the paved blacktop bypass. The sign reads:

Winter storm trail bypass

Upper trail can be dangerous during winter storms

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/hard-surface-bicycle-bypass-near-port-angeles/

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Another warning on Olympic Discovery Trail

I've never seen a warning sign like this before, but I suppose it's appropriate for bicycle riders prone to being startled.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/another-warning-on-olympic-discovery-trail/

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Downhill warning sign

Several warnings are posted along the Olympic Discovery Trail about steep descents. Be also warned: Steep descents are followed by steep ascents. I dismounted a few times on my touring bike, but for the ascent.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2006/09/02/downhill-warning-sign/

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Oceanside, California

Here's the beach and pier at Oceanside, Calif., from Oceanside Chamber of Commerce website (I had run out of film a couple of days earlier and never restocked).

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2005/08/04/oceanside-california/

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Day 66 – Late evening campsite in Anza Borrego desert

Deep sand but great view from this campsite.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.bikingbis.com/2005/08/02/day-66-late-evening-campsite-in-anza-borrego-desert/

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